Bacon Wrapped SPAM Bites

Bacon Wrapped SPAM

SPAM is the canned mystery meat that seems to languish on Supermarket shelves everywhere. Unless you are preparing for a Hurricane or are waxing nostalgically over Cold War bunkers SPAM just does not seem to penetrate into the mainstream. We are here to throw down the gauntlet and say “Yes!!! SPAM does have a place!” Bacon Wrapped SPAM is an awesome appetizer and party food if you are looking for something a little bit different.

Bacon Wrapped SPAM

These bacon wrapped SPAM bites are first coated in our famous Pork Rub, then wrapped in bacon, and finally smoked for around 2 hours.

Ingredients

  • A can of SPAM
  • 1/4 Cup of our famous Pork Rub. (when we make the rub we don’t add any salt when we are making it for this. The bacon and the SPAM have enough on their own.)
  • 8 slices of bacon

The Prep

  1. Remove the SPAM from it’s can.
  2. Cube the SPAM into 16 pieces.
  3. Put the SPAM cubes into a Zip-Loc bag with the 1/4 cup of rub. Shake the bag till you have a nice even coat on all of the cubes.
  4. Cut the 8 slices of bacon in half.
  5. Wrap the rub coated SPAM cubes with a half slice of bacon each. Hold the bacon onto the SPAM cube with a skewer. We have experimented and find that one wrap with the bacon is enough. Having open sides on the SPAM cube lets you get the flavor of the SPAM, the rub, and the bacon. Fully bacon wrapped SPAM cubes seem to be overwhelmingly bacon-ness.

Bacon wrapped SPAM

The Process

  1. Pre-heat your smoker to 250 degress and add a handful of hickory chips.
  2. Place the bacon wrapped SPAM bites into the smoker.
  3. Smoke for 2 hours. The SPAM is a cooked meat so you really are just shooting for crispy bacon.
  4. Pull them out and let them cool down. They can be a little juicy and nuclear hot SPAM juice sort of leaves third degree burns on the roof of your mouth!

The Wrap Up

We like to serve these bad-boys with a Sriracha Honey Mustard  (follow the link and give that one a try, it is amazing!)  Get over you fear of the canned meat because Bacon Wrapped SPAM bites rock!

You might also like:

Try our awesome Armadillo Eggs

Bacon Wrapped Meatballs from mmmgoblubbq

 

 

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Grilled Pork Loin with Fresh Rosemary

Grilled Pork Loin

Grilled Pork Loin is an underrated piece of meat. Pork butt, ribs, and bacon get all the glory when it comes to swine worship but the loin can really shine with a little love. We combine our grilled pork loin with the timeless flavors of Dijon mustard, rosemary, and garlic. This is particularly rewarding piece of meat to grill well. With the rapidly climbing price of foof a grilled pork loin is the perfect cheap piece of meat to turn into something special.

Grilled Pork Loin with Fresh Rosemary

The Paste

  • 2 Tablespoons of Dijon Mustard
  • 1 Tablespoon of Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 Tablespoon Fresh Rosemary, chopped finely
  • 1 Clove of Garlic, chopped finely
  • Fresh Ground Black Pepper
  • Coarse Ground Kosher Salt or Sea Salt
  1. Combine all of the ingredients and work into a paste.
  2. Add the salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Set aside

 The Pork Loin

  • 3 Pound Pork Loin
  • 3 feet of Butcher’s Twine.
  1. Carefully slice the pork loin lengthwise a little at a time, slowly un-rolling the loin.  When done you should be left with a relatively flat piece of pork.
  2. Slather the paste on both sides of the pork.
  3. Gently roll the pork into a tight roll.
  4. Using the butcher’s twine tie the pork into a tight roll.

 

Putting the grilled in grilled Pork Loin

  1. Set the grill up for indirect grilling and let it pre-heat for roughly 10 minutes.
  2. Place the pork loin on the indirect side.
  3. Cook the pork loin to an internal temperature of 145 degrees.
  4. Let it rest a few minutes and slice into 1/2 inch rounds.

We like to serve it with some grilled romaine lettuce and roasted potatoes. Grilled Pork Loin is a fairly easy recipe to make and it just flat out looks and tastes awesome!

If you liked this recipes check out:

Our Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin

 

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Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin

Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin

 What kind of sick individuals wrap pork on pork? Us here at flames and food are just the kind of sick and twisted individuals to do it! Follow along and check out our Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin!

Bacon Wrapped Pork Loin

  • 3 Pound Boneless Pork Loin
  • 1 Pound of Bacon
  • 3 Tablespoons of our Pork Rub
  1.    We start by giving the Pork Loin a generous massaging with our pork rub. The sugars in the rub will work together really well with the smokey saltiness of the bacon, and add some depth.
  2. Wrap the pork loin with the bacon. We don’t get to fancy with this. We do use toothpicks underneath the pork loin to hold the bacon on.
  3. Set your grill up for indirect heat. We do this on our Weber Gas Grill with the 2 outside burners on Medium-High. This gives us right around 350 degrees at the cooking surface. (For a really good explanation of direct versus indirect grilling, check out this site. . .)
  4. We cook the bacon wrapped pork loin to an internal temp of 145 degrees. This should give you a nice medium rare.

Bacon Wrapped Pork TenderloinWe liked to serve this sliced with some nice roasted potatoes and a good applesauce. Now you  can easily open up a jar of Motts and we won’t fault you for this at all. A good homemade applesauce will take this bacon wrapped pork loin to the next level! Pork and apples is up there with peanut butter and chocolate, as far as food pairings go and this double pork monstrosity really benefits from the homemade version.

 

If you liked this recipe, check out some of our others!

Awesome Spareribs Recipe

Armadillo Eggs , these babies really have to be seen to be believed. Sausage wrapped stuffed jalapenos, are you kidding?

 

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Awesome Spareribs Recipe

Spareribs recipe   We love pork butts and beef brisket but our spareribs recipe is what really gets our heart beating faster around here! When it is time to make something real special we rub up a few racks of spareribs and get the smoker up to temperature.

Ribs have a lot of things going for them. They have a tremendous amount of marbling and the bone itself imparts additional flavor. Plus they come with their own built in handle, what is not to love about them? Ribs just scream party and our spareribs recipe will get you to the promised land!

Spareribs Recipe

As with everything our spareribs recipe starts with good meat. Unlike a beef brisket or a pork butt, ribs need a bit of pre-rub prep. Most time spareribs come with the silver skin still attached, this white and silvery membrane is a tough customer and needs to be removed (I found a great tutorial on doing this).

Once the silver skin is removed it is time to show the spareribs some rub love. Of course we use our own Pork Rub Recipe. The sugars in our rub caramelize nicely while the ribs on the smoker and we are freaks for Cumin! As with our pork butts and beef briskets, we like to rub the ribs the day before, and wrap them tightly for an evening in the fridge.

These ribs will need to be smoked at 250 degrees with a nice handful of hickory thrown in. This is where we are going to drive you crazy, after beating the drum of temp over time, we wing it with spareribs. With our spareribs recipe we apply the arcane ritual of seeing how far the meat pulls back from the bone. Trust us we know the hypocrisy of this, but we have never had much luck with trying to cook ribs to a temp or a time! We figure on 2 to 2 1/2 hours at 250 gets you into the ball park, then it is quick peeks under the cover looking for about a 1/4 inch of bone showing at the top of the rib.

When the ribs are almost done we crank up the gas grill. Once the ribs reach the magical point of smoked to perfection we pull them off of the smoker and slather them in sauce and throw them on to the hot gas grill for a quick sear. This step caramelizes the sauce and we feel it locks in the flavor. Be carefully you are looking for a bit of color, not a burnt mess, so stay close to the grill. We actually use a commercial sauce around here when we make our spareribs recipe. We are particularly fond of Bone Suckin’ Sauce Thicker Style, when we come up with a sauce of our own that is worth sharing you will see it on these pages!

So there you have our Spareribs Recipe we hope you enjoy it!

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Pork Butt Recipes: Lechon Asada

Pork Butt RecipesWe are always on the look out for great pork butt recipes, and this Lechon Asada fits the bill in a big way! Like a lot of awesome pork butt recipes this one starts with a good rub and gets carefully basted while it is on the smoker. If you are looking to add to your your pork butt recipes this is one to save! This Cuban inspired pork will have you looking for a mojito and turning up the salsa and reggae.

Pork Butt Recipes: Lechon Asada

The Rub

  • 1 Tbs Coarse Kosher Salt
  • 2 tsp Fresh Ground Black Pepper
  • 2 tsp Ground White Pepper
  • 2 tsp Ground Cumin
  • 2 tsp Dried Oregano (We grind this into a powder)
  • 2 tsp Garlic Powder

Give the pork butt a good healthy rub and wrap it tightly with plastic wrap. We like to do this the night before, but if pressed for time you can skip this step, and put the pork butt right out onto the smoker.

The Baste

This is a Mojo inspired baste. Mojo is a citrusy and garlicky sauce that is used a ton in Cuban cuisine. This is our take on it.

  • The Juice of 12 Fresh Limes
  • The Juice of 2 Oranges
  • Whole Head of Garlic (I run mine through a press)
  • 1 Tbs Coarse Kosher Salt
  • 1 Tbs Dried Oregano
  • 2 tsp Ground Cumin
  • 1/4 Cup Fresh Chopped Cilantro
  • 1 Tbs Olive Oil

Pork Butt Recipes

This Lechon Asada is best smoked at 250 degrees, to an internal temperature of 185 degrees. We mop it with the Mojo sauce every hour while it is on.  We take this pork butt off a good 10 degrees below where we normally would, because we like to slice it and not shred it. We love to have this on a Cuban Sandwich or with good Cuban rice and beans. You will be surprised at how well all the flavors come together in a garlicky, salty, peppery, citrusy way. It is a wholly different experience than a Southern Style Pork Butt, but it is just as good. Trust us you won’t be disappointed!

If you liked this check out our other Pork Butt Recipes:

How to make Awesome Smoked Pork Butt

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Armadillo Eggs on the Kamado Grill

Armadillo EggsJust what the Hell are Armadillo Eggs? The name confused my Mother to no end, she kept repeating “But, Armadillos are mammals!”. From what I can find on the web, they are just a tongue in cheek name for a funky Tex-Mex appetizer. What isn’t in doubt is that they are one of the coolest smoked treats you can make. They are good from the Kamado Grill, off of the Weber, or right out of the oven.

Making Armadillo Eggs

  • 1 Pound of  Hot Sausage (We used Hot Italian)
  • 4 Medium Jalapenos (seeded, de-veined, and cut in half length ways)
  • 4 ounces Cream Cheese (Softened)
  • 1/4 Cup Cheddar Cheese (Shredded)
  • 1/2 Teaspoon of Ground Cumin
  1. Seed, de-vein, and cut the Jalapenos in half length wise.
  2. Mix the softened cream cheese, shredded cheddar, and ground cumin together in a medium bowl.
  3. Fill the jalapeno halves with the cheese mixture and set them aside.
  4. Cut the casings off of the sausage.
  5. Form the bulk sausage into 8 equal balls.
  6. Take the balls and press them down into thin disks.
  7. Put the filled jalapeno halves into the discs, and wrap the sausage around the rest of the pepper. Make sure the sausage completely encompasses the pepper.

Using an oven:

Pre-heat to 350 degrees. Place the Armadillo Eggs on a wire rack over a foil lined baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Watch out for the surface of the sun hot cheese inside!

On the grill:

Set your grill up for indirect heat. Place the Armadillo Eggs on the indirect side of the grill. Grill them until they take on a uniform brown color. We like to throw them onto the hot grates and get a bit of grill  marks on them. Again watch out for the nuclear fusion going on inside these babies! You will burn the F@&K out of your mouth.

In the Kamado Grill:

Bring your Kamado Grill up to 350 degrees with a handful of hickory chips over the hot coals. Smoke the Armadillo Eggs for 25 minutes. One last reminder the cheese is napalm hot!!!

Armadillo Egss

Armadillo Eggs are fun and different kind of treat to make. They are great on their own but go great with a good  homemade Ranch Dressing. You can also make them with a sweet sausage to tone down the heat a bit. We love them around here! Give them a try and please let us know what you think in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

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Making Bacon at Home

Making BaconMaking bacon at home is surprisingly easy but a bit time consuming. If you have some salt, a refrigerator, a smoker, and a week to kill you can have the ultimate food at home! The nicest thing about home curing bacon is you can control the flavor profile. For this round of making bacon we went with a honey cure and hickory smoke.

Making Bacon

Making bacon at home, starts with two things, pork belly and a salt cure. Since bacon has caught on like wildfire in the media, pork belly has become easier to find. It once was the province of Asian and Hispanic markets, but it can now be found at the local butcher or supermarket.

The Dry Cure

  • 16 oz Kosher Salt
  • 8 oz Sugar
  • 8 tsp Pink Salt (Insta Cure #1)

A dry cure is one of the few things we weigh out around here. We are big fans of standard measurements, but when it comes to beating back the botulism fairy we don’t fool around. The Pink Salt has nitrates in it, which inhibits the growth of botulism spores. There is a bit of controversy when it comes to using nitrates, but we are big proponents of it.  Botulism isn’t something to fool around with.

The Directions

  1. Spread some cure out on a baking sheet.
  2. Firmly press the Pork Belly into the cure on all sides. You are shooting for a nice uniform coating.
  3. Place the coated belly into a large Zip-Loc bag and place it flat in the refrigerator.
  4. Turn the soon-to-be bacon every other day. This redistributes the liquid which aids in the curing process.
  5. On the 7th day feel the bacon, it should have a new found firmness to it.
  6. Soak the bacon in cold water for 10 minutes, then change out the water and soak for 10 more minutes.
  7. Pat the bacon dry.
  8. Pre-heat your smoker to 200 degrees and smoke the bacon to 150 degrees internal
  9. While it is still hot use  a large knife to remove the skin.
  10. Wait for it to cool, wrap, and place it in the refrigerator.

Home made bacon

This round of bacon we added 1/4 cup of honey to the Zip-Loc while the bacon cured. We also threw a handful of hickory chips into the smoker. The bacon came out with a nice sweetness to it and just enough smokey flavor. Making bacon is a fun and rewarding exercise. We generally make a pound and a half a week around here. It is awesome in all sorts of recipes, we especially like it in a big Dutch Oven full of beans.

For further reading on bacon check out Amazing Ribs. . .

Making Bacon at Home on Punk Domestics

 

 

 

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Pork Rub Recipe from Flames and Food

Pork Rub RecipeWhether it is butts, loins, or ribs our Pork Rub Recipe is aces! Salt and Pepper seasoning is appropriate for all smoking occasions, but sometimes you want a little bit more than the minimalist approach, for those times open up the spice drawer, and give our pork rub recipe a try.

Pork Rub Recipe

  • 2 Tablespoons of Firmly Packed Light Brown Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon of Granulated Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon of Chili Powder
  • 1 Tablespoon of Coriander Seed (2 teaspoons of ground coriander)
  • 1 Tablespoon of Cumin Seed (2 teaspoons ground cumin)
  • 1 Tablespoon of Black Peppercorns (2 teaspoons ground black pepper)
  • 2 Tablespoons of Kosher Salt
  • 1/4 Cup of Paprika

Pork Rub Recipe Toasting and hand grinding the coriander seeds, cumin seeds, and black peppercorns is what separates this pork rub recipe from one that comes out of can. Toasting the seeds and peppercorns in a skillet before you grind them, allows the dry heat to transform them. It draws out their distinct aromas, mellows, and adds a pretty distinct toasty-ness to them. You can use the flat bottom of a small skillet to crush up the seeds and peppercorns, but here at Flames and Food, we enjoy getting out the Molcajete and grinding away.

  1. Gently toast the coriander seeds, cumin seeds, and black pepper corns for a few minutes in a dry skillet.
  2. Grind the toasted seeds and peppercorns.
  3. Add all the ingredients to a food processor and pulse until mixed well.

We go a little lighter on salt in the pork rub recipe than you will find in most. We believe that excess salt in a rub, that is going to sit on meat for an extended time needlessly draws out moisture. With most commercially available pork being fairly lean, we want to leave as much moisture in the meat as possible. We would rather season to taste after the smoking/grilling process is over.

The granulated sugar is in this pork rub recipe solely to help break up the brown sugar, and make the rub easier to apply to the meat. The moist brown sugar tends to clump up a bit, and the regular stuff helps mitigate it. The molasses taste of the brown sugar still comes through, so we see it as a best of both worlds solution.

The Toys:

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How to make Awesome Smoked Pork Butt

Smoking, Pork Butt, Pulled Pork

The smell of a large hunk of Pork Butt slowly cooking over a hardwood fire can only be described as heavenly, experience it once, and you’ll want to know how to make awesome smoked pork butt for yourself.

Pork Butt or Boston Butt, is a cut that comes from the upper part of the the front shoulder on the Pig. Ironically the name has nothing to do with the behind of the pig. It actually comes from the fact that this piece of meat wasn’t highly valued in Pre-Revolutionary War America. So the pieces were thrown into barrels, which were also known as “butts”, and shipped out. The butchers in Boston had a particular way of cutting this piece of meat so,the name Boston Butt stuck. This cut is known for it’s ample marbling and prominent fat cap. It is a big, hard working muscle so it needs a long slow cook to turn it into something to be proud of. It is perfect for Southern style BBQ, Mexican Carnitas,  or Puerto Rican Pernil. Those who take the time to show this hunk of pork it’s due reverence, will be rewarded with a buttery, and velvety dish that will wow guests!

There are many different combinations of spices that can be rubbed onto a pork butt before it goes into the smoker, but sometimes the simplicity of salt and pepper can’t be beat. If you are going to go this route you are going to season the meat and not rub it. The difference is subtle but important! A rub will be put on rather heavy where a seasoning is only to enhance the natural flavor of the meat (Don’t worry here at Flames and Food we embrace both methods!). After the meat is seasoned wrap it tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 4 hours, but over-night is better.

When you are ready to start smoking do yourself a favor and take the meat of the fridge. Starting with a 40 degree piece of meat will needlessly lengthen the cooking time. An 8 pound Pork Butt can stand for an hour while the smoker heats up with no adverse effects.

Start bringing your smoker up to temp. Pork Butt loves a nice slow cook at right around 250 degrees. This Pork Butt loves a nice handful hickory chips thrown in. Hickory gives a strong traditional flavor, and the fatty richness of the pork just laps it up.

Unlike a brisket a Pork Butt goes into the smoker fatty side down. The ample marbling of provides a built in cushion against drying out the meat and it doesn’t need the extra self basting that the fat cap provides. You should figure on at least an hour a pound of cooking time. Careful monitoring of the meat and grill temperatures is important. A good wireless thermometer that does both is awesome for this (we like the one from Ivation ).

Every hour or so give the Pork Butt a spritz with some Apple Juice. Juice has extra sugar in it versus cider and this helps to build a good “bark” on the meat. The “bark” is a signature of a lovingly smoked pork butt.  When the meat starts to get up near 190 – 195 degrees, it is ready to come off. Now if you aren’t accustomed to smoking,  you might be concerned with such a high temp, but it is necessary to get the fat to render out of the meat, and for the tough muscle to break down. This is what gives good BBQ it’s characteristic tenderness.

Wrap the Smoked Pork Butt tightly in foil and let it rest for at  least half and hour. It will be hard! You’re the cook so pulling off a bit of the “bark” before you wrap it is only fair. Throwing an old towel over it to hold in the heat is welcome as well. (Note: after the Butt is wrapped in foil it can be wrapped in towels and placed in a cooler. It will stay hot for several hours. This is a great way to prepare BBQ ahead of time. It is always better to have your food waiting on the guests instead of your guests waiting on the food.)

The best part of a well made Smoked Pork Butt is the time when you grab the piece of shoulder blade still in the meat and pull it out with a flourish! It should slide easily and cleanly out. Then it is up to you whether to slice the meat, shred it with claws, or pull it by hand. It will be delicious either method you go with. However you decide to serve it this  meal needs a quality sauce. This one with it’s humble salt and pepper seasoning, loves a bold sauce like an Eastern North Carolina vinegar based sauce. Those Eastern NC sauces are nothing but vinegar, heat, salt and hate. Around here, our house one is known as Demon Spit.

Smoked Pork Butt, the Details:

Smoke between 225-250 degrees

An hour a pound (give or take)

Cook to an internal temp of 195 degrees

REST the meat for at least 30 minutes.

Have fun

 

Affiliate Disclosure: I am grateful to be of service and bring you content free of charge. In order to do this, please note that when you click links and purchase items, in most (not all) cases I will receive a referral commission. Your support in purchasing through these links enables me to keep the content train rolling