Smoked Bologna With Brown Sugar And Mustard Glaze

Smoked Bolgona

Smoked Bologna

Who knew that the bane of lunchboxes everywhere could be turned into something magical with a little bit of brown sugar, some mustard, a dash of hot sauce, and of course our favorite ingredient hickory smoke. Smoked bologna is one of those unexpected treats that if didn’t grow up in the Mid-West you are completely oblivious of and we are sad that we were unaware of it until now!

The Ingredients

  • 1 Pound of 1 inch thick sliced Bologna. Depending on where you live finding this can be little more challenging than you would think. We don’t live in an area where we can get a chub (I had full chub written but it just seemed vaguely dirty for a family barbecue blog), we ended up trying to explain to the deli counter person that we wanted an inch thick slab of bologna.
  • 1/4 Cup Light Brown Sugar
  • 1/4 Cup Dijon Mustard
  • 1 Teaspoon Frank’s Hot Sauce

 The How-To

  1. Combine the Light Brown Sugar,  Dijon Mustard, and the teaspoon of hot sauce together in a small bowl. Whisk them together well.
  2. Slather the thick bologna slices with the glaze. Reserve some for a mid smoke slather.
  3. Pre-Heat your smoker to 250 degrees. We like to use hickory chips for the smoked bologna. It gives a good smoke flavor with being over powering.
  4. Once the smoker is up to temperature put the glazed bologna slices into it and let is smoke for 1 hour.
  5. After an hour in the smoker flip the slabs over and give them another slather with the reserved glaze.
  6. Give them another half hour of smoke and then remove them form the smoker.
  7. Cut the smoked bologna slabs into cubes and serve warm.

The Wrap-Up

These smoked bologna bites are awesome! Since we didn’t grow up in an area where these are served it has been a hard sell to our friends and family but after one bite we are getting  a bunch of new converts. It might be time to track down a full chub!

Check Out Our Other Appetizers

Armadillo Eggs

Bacon Wrapped SPAM

 

 

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Beef Short Ribs Recipe

Beef Short Ribs RecipeWe have got an amazing beef short ribs recipe to share with you! Beef Short Ribs aren’t everyday fare. They are a bit of a challenge to cook well. Just like a beef brisket is more challenging than a pork butt, beef short ribs are harder to get right than pork ribs. They may be full of flavor but they are also full of tough connective tissue that has to be slowly broken down by a long low smoke.

Beef Short Ribs Recipe

A great beef short ribs recipe starts with a great rub. Since we don’t make beef short ribs all that much we make the rub in small batches that get used up in one shot. This rub is for 3 pounds of short ribs.

The Rub

  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons of Coarse Kosher Salt
  • 1 Tablespoon of Turbinado Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon Chili Powder
  • 1 Teaspoon of  Ground Cumin
  • 1 Teaspoon of Garlic Powder
  • 1 Teaspoon of Dried Parsley
  • 1 Teaspoon of Ground Black Pepper

The Recipe

  1. Mix all the ingredients of the rub in a 1 gallon Zip-Loc.
  2. We lightly brush the short ribs with Vegetable Oil. This real helps the rub to stick.
  3. Put the short ribs into the bag and shake vigorously. Put them in the fridge for up to 24 hours.
  4. Set your smoker up for a 225 degree smoke with a handful of your favorite smoking wood.
  5. Stick a temp probe into the largest of the short ribs. You are shooting for 185 degrees internal. This is the temperature where those tough connective tissues will break down into a beautiful jelly mess.
  6. Take them off and rest them for 10-20 minutes. They don’t need to pull back a mass of juice like a brisket or a pork butt, but they benefit from it as well.

This Beef Short Ribs Recipe goes well with good baked beans and some coleslaw.

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Smoking a Beef Brisket

Beef BrisketSmoked Beef Brisket is practically a religion unto itself in Texas. The names of the great pit-masters are up there with Sam Houston and Tom Landry. To be able to take that mammoth hunk of beef brisket and turn it into something that is extraordinary is quite an undertaking. First you have a piece of meat that should have it’s own zip code, then it lacks the marbling that helps other cuts of meat stay succulent. In fact, the muscles that make up a beef brisket actually help to support 60% of the weight of a cow, next time you’re looking  at a twelve hundred pound steer take that into consideration. As the brisket is a load bearing muscle, it is lean and filled with connective tissue. It takes a long slow smoke to start to break these down. The problem is the long cooking time can dry out a beef brisket till it is tough like an old boot. So smoking a beef brisket is like taking a walk on a tightrope, cook it too long and it is  dry, under cook it and it might be moist but it is tough. What makes a brisket extra terrifying is, at 12 to 15 pounds, you’re not whipping one up for yourself. So usually your closet family and friends are around for your great failure or great triumph!

Smoking a Beef Brisket

Great barbecue beef brisket starts with great beef brisket. Getting a hold of one of these usually requires a trip to the butcher. Your local grocery store is most likely not stocking these monster cuts. A whole beef brisket might seem like a daunting task but we think the whole piece is the way to go. You get two distinct cuts with a whole brisket, the point and the flat, they are separated by a nice layer of fat. Some pit-masters separate the point and the flat during cooking. We like to leave them together as we feel that the nice pocket of fat between them contributes to the flat remaining juicy. We do separate them before slicing, the point will get tucked away for later while the flat goes to the unwashed masses.  We have our butcher trim a little bit of fat from the brisket, an 1/8″ is just about right to leave on.

There are many good rubs out there, Big Bad Beef Rub from Amazing Ribs is one of our favorites. Rub the beef brisket on both sides, you need to get it into all the nooks and crannies. Slap on a pair of gloves and get elbow deep. Just like our smoked pork butt ,the beef brisket gets wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, and placed in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours.

Our briskets go into a 225 degree smoker with the fat cap up. There is a ton of debate on fat up versus fat down, we are squarely in the fat up camp. We believe that as the fat cap renders down it acts as a self baster for the brisket, helping to keep it moist.

Once your brisket is on the smoker (with a handful of hickory chips) the LONG wait begins. A full brisket with a minimum of trimming will go on the smoker weighing in the neighborhood of 12 pounds. That is a lot of meat, so get comfortable for the next 12 – 14 hours that you’ll be baby sitting it. We spritz our briskets with Apple Juice every hour on the hour until it reaches an internal temp of 150 degrees. At that point it is time for a tight double wrap in foil with a heavy squirt of apple juice. The foil helps to power through the stall that these huge pieces of meat can encounter. The added juice helps to braise the brisket and keep the temperature moving upwards.

We have found the best results with taking beef brisket to an internal temp of 200 degrees. If you are more familiar with grilling steaks this will seem like an insane temp for a piece of beef,  but those heavy connective tissues need time and temp to break down. The brisket comes off the smoker and goes straight into a clean empty cooler. It is covered with towels, to help keep the heat in, and allowed to rest for at least 1 hour. We find that the long hot rest lets the juices redistribute throughout the meat. This helps to make sure that the brisket is uniformly juicy.

Beef Brisket

 

The brisket will have a nice smoke ring and will be succulent. It can be served sliced or chopped. We like to serve it sliced pencil thick, it should pull apart easily with your fingers. It can also be chopped and served with a tangy sauce on a sandwich, this might get you shot in Texas but we go with what tastes  good.

Turning out great beef brisket at at home puts you near the top of the food chain for backyard grillheads, so don’t be afraid to give it a shot. Use our tips, take your time, and enjoy the accolades of your guests!

Let us know what you think!!!

Affiliate Disclosure: I am grateful to be of service and bring you content free of charge. In order to do this, please note that when you click links and purchase items, in most (not all) cases I will receive a referral commission. Your support in purchasing through these links enables me to keep the content train rolling